August 6 marked a sombre reminder of the Hiroshima bombing by a US fighter plane which left 70,000 killed and 100,000 injured. Paul Tibbets, the pilot who flew the B-29 which dropped the 10,000 pound atom bomb on the Japanese city felt no regrets as he claimed to the media. In fact, he is quoted as saying that the suggestion that the suggestion that the atomic attack was morally wrong was "hogwash." Tibbets died at the age of 92 in Columbus Ohio, on November 1, 2007. He always claimed he had no regrets over the World War II mission, which is seen by historians as one of the greatest tragedies to have ever visited humanity and one of the cruellest acts of man on fellow-men.

Tibbets flew his B-29 bomber over Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 and dropped the atom bomb, which in a revolting instance of dark humour was named by the Americans, "Little Boy." It killed at least 70,000, is reported to have injured at least 100,000 and many more. The atom bomb has scarred Hiroshima and its surroundings and to this day the effects of radiation are felt.

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