Why Are Osmania Hospital Doctors Wearing Helmet On Duty? The Reason is Pretty Serious!

Why Are Osmania Hospital Doctors Wearing Helmet On Duty? The Reason is Pretty Serious! - Sakshi Post

Some junior doctors wore helmets to work on Tuesday, highlighting the city's oldest hospital's deteriorating state and inadequate facilities.

Hyderabad: A group of junior doctors at the government-run Osmania General Hospital in Hyderabad wore helmets to work on Tuesday as a show of solidarity after a doctor was hurt when a ceiling fan fell on her.

In the outpatient building, a ceiling fan snapped off its hinges and fell on a final-year resident doctor from the Dermatology Department, causing head trauma. According to medical authorities, the fan was 40 years old when the event occurred on Monday.

Some junior doctors wore helmets to work on Tuesday, highlighting the city's oldest hospital's deteriorating state and inadequate facilities.

Junior doctors held a quiet protest, urging that authorities take quick action to avoid such occurrences from occurring again. Despite repeated requests, they claim that no steps have been done to upgrade the infrastructure.

The doctors blamed the terrible circumstances at the over-a-century-old facility on the authorities' neglect.

OGH Superintendent Dr B. Nagender, on the other hand, described Monday's occurrence as sporadic. He stated that the hospital's difficulties would be remedied with the construction of a new structure and that the case is still ongoing in court.

This isn't the first time doctors have used new methods of protest.

One of the younger doctors, Pratibha, said that in 2018, they donned helmets to emphasise the building's deteriorating state. They also held outpatient checks under trees to draw attention to the issues they were having owing to a lack of suitable equipment and facilities.

Patients also complained about hospital personnel incompetence and a lack of basic amenities such as mattresses. Some patients were spotted laying on the ground in the hospital grounds, with their attendants carrying saline bottles.

Osmania Hospital is the oldest hospital in Hyderabad and one of the largest state-run healthcare institutions in Telangana. It is located on the banks of the river.

The hospital building, on the other hand, is deteriorating and has been in the press for all the wrong reasons. Patches of plaster can be seen flaking off, and there have been several films showing stray dogs wandering the wards, water and drainage pipeline leaks, patients resting on the ground and even outside the facility, and mounds of rubbish.

The hospital's oldest section was flooded last year due to severe rainfall. Rain and drainage water had flooded the hospital's halls, passageways, and wards, creating significant annoyance to patients.

With ankle-deep water filling the ward, patients and their staff were perched atop beds.

Water pouring inside the hospital and washing away different items, as well as medical employees attempting to halt the flow, went popular on social media. The historic block was closed as a result of the event.

The state administration recommended the demolition of the structure in 2015, claiming it was physically unsound and inappropriate for use as a conventional hospital. It planned to construct two 24-story skyscrapers.

However, the government was obliged to abandon its intentions to demolish the building because of intense protests from historians, heritage activists, and influential residents. The issue is presently before the High Court for consideration.

The hospital was erected by Mir Osman Ali Khan, the last Nizam of Hyderabad, and named after him following the Musi floods of 1908.

It was constructed in 1919 and was designed in the Indo-Saracenic style by British architect Vincent Jerome Esch and Nawab Khan Bahadur Mirza Akbar Baig.

The hospital is made up of 11 primary components that cover 26.5 acres. The inpatient building alone covers 2.37 acres and has a total bed capacity of 1,168, including 363 beds in super-speciality units.


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