Act Now: End Child Labour, Says ILO

 - Sakshi Post

World Day Against Child Labour is observed on June 12 every year. 

Child Labour is prevalent around the world, with children, usually from low-income families, being forced to work in dangerous situations, resulting in employers' ongoing physical, mental, and social exploitation and misery

Child Labour has risen to 160 million globally, according to the ILO and UNICEF’s newest study, the first increase in 20 years

World Day Against Child Labour 2021: On Saturday, people all around the world will commemorate World Day Against Child Labour, which aims to raise awareness about unlawful employment practices and discuss strategies to eliminate them. In 2002, the International Labour Organization (ILO), a United Nations body, founded it. The theme for this year is "Act Now: End Child Labour."

Child labour is prevalent around the world, with children, usually from low-income families, being forced to work in dangerous situations, resulting in employers' ongoing physical, mental, and social exploitation and misery. Children are denied the opportunity to enjoy their childhood to the utmost and are also denied access to education.

Child labour has risen to 160 million worldwide, according to the ILO and UNICEF’s newest study, marking the first increase in 20 years.

There has also been a considerable increase in the number of children aged 5 to 11, who now account for more than half of the world's population.

"The number of children in child labour has risen to 160 million worldwide -- an increase of 8.4 million children in the last four years -- with millions more at risk due to the impact of Covid-19," the report added.

Child labour is more prevalent in developing nations like India. According to the 2011 census, there were 259.64 million children aged 5 to 14, with 10.1 million of them working as child labourers. Whether it's the production of firecrackers in Tamil Nadu's Sivakasi, the country's bangle-making sector, roadside cafés, and restaurants, construction sites, or even housework, youngsters from disadvantaged backgrounds have long been easy prey.

The coronavirus disease (Covid-19) epidemic, according to UNICEF India representative Dr. Yasmin Ali Haque, has exacerbated the danger of child labour in the nation, as more families have been forced into poverty. "Children in poor and disadvantaged households in India are now at a greater risk of negative coping mechanisms such as dropping out of school and being forced into labour, marriage, and even falling victim to human trafficking," Haque added.

Several well-known consumer companies, including Forever 21, Cadbury, H&M, GAP, and others, have been accused of using minors in their production divisions to save money in recent years. Many activists and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have spoken out against this, urging consumers not to purchase items from such companies.

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