Countless stories have been written about the benefits of wine, in particular the red wine.

It is rich in anti-oxidants and has several health benefits. For the health-conscious, who focus on how many calories are consumed and burnt in a day, here are a few notes on the benefits, contents and words of caution about the celebrated drink. But first, it should be made clear that red wine is made from grapes and debates about alcohol content varies with each region and manufacturer.

Wine And Health

The skin of the grapes is rich in antioxidants, and especially one specific antioxidant called resveratrol. The latter helps offset the effects of a high fat diet. Red wine reduces risks of breast cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Notably, five or more glasses of red wine a month had a positive effect on women’s fertility.

Sugar Content

Red wine actually has more sugar than other liquors. But a very dry, highly fermented wine does not have much sugar content. Also, all wines, whether red, white or rose, can be produced in a range of residual sugar that may vary from very dry to very sweet. This is usually represented on a wine label in French terms as Brut, Sec, Demi-Sec, Demi-doux or Doux. Typically, a Doux style wine will have more sugar than other alcohol.

Words Of Caution

"Recommended limit" is the key to wine just as any other alcoholic beverage. Experts recommend not more than two glasses on any day. Also, five glasses in a week is another measure of recommended limit.

Flipside

Despite the benefits of red wine, the alcohol itself is a neurotoxin, meaning it can poison your brain and tax your liver, among other bodily systems. it should be remembered that the main active ingredient of wine is alcohol, and therefore, the health effects of alcohol apply to wine. Drinking small quantities of wine is associated with a decreased risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and early death. Drinking more than this amount however, increases the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke.